Late-Wisconsin glaciation of southwestern Newfoundland (with special reference to the Stephenville map-area)
Read Online
Share

Late-Wisconsin glaciation of southwestern Newfoundland (with special reference to the Stephenville map-area)

  • 969 Want to read
  • ·
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Energy, Mines and Resources in Ottawa .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Glacial epoch- Newfoundland

Book details:

Edition Notes

11

The Physical Object
Pagination31 p.
Number of Pages31
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22034471M

Download Late-Wisconsin glaciation of southwestern Newfoundland (with special reference to the Stephenville map-area)

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

The purpose of this paper is to describe the detailed sedimentology and age data of Quaternary sediments in coastal exposures at Highlands, southwest Newfoundland. These exposures are critical to an ongoing debate on the extent and timing of a Late Wisconsinan readvance across the lowlands around St. George's by: During late Wisconsin time the major glacial advance in the western part of the region investigated reached its farthest extent south in at least three pulses: 21,, 19,, yrs ago. The oscillating retreats were interrupted by three documented . Lac La Jannaye, Quebec - Newfoundland / by I.M. Stevenson; Geology of Sunnyside map-area, Newfoundland, 1 N/ report and map / by W.D. McCartney; Late-Wisconsin glaciation of southwestern Newfoundland (with special reference to the Stephenville map-a The geology of the Michikamau Intrusion, Labrador (13 L, 23 I) / [by] R. F. Emslie. The absence of igneous and metamorphic clasts of Canadian Shield origin in the Saskatchewan gravels and sands (preglacial) valley fills in seven active gravel pits studied over a 5 yr period, coupled with 29 radiocarbon dates (21,, yr B.P.), suggest that Laurentide glaciation prior to the late Wisconsin did not reach the Edmonton by:

Late Wisconsinan stratigraphy and chronology of southern St. George's Bay, Newfoundland: A re-appraisal Article (PDF Available) in Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 38(5) February QUATERNARY RESEA () Time of Maximum Late Wisconsin Glaciation, West Coast of Canada BERTRAND BLAISE,*'1 JOHN J. CLAGUE,t AND ROLF W. MATHEWES$ *Pacific Geoscience Center, Geological Survey of Canada, P.O. Box , West Saanich Rd., Sidney, British Columbia, Canada V8L 4B2; (Terrain Sciences Division, Geological Survey of Canada, Cited by: Seafloor imagery in the present paper can be compared with that from the littoral zone off southwestern Newfoundland (Shaw et al., xmm ( x DPI) Fig. 9. The Alaska PaleoGlacier Atlas is a geospatial summary of Pleistocene glaciation across Alaska. The layers in the atlas depict: 1) the extent of glaciers during the late Wisconsin glaciation (also known as the Last Glacial Maximum, ab years ago), and 2) the maximum extent reached during the last 3 million years by the northwestern Cordilleran Ice Sheet, ice caps, and valley glaciers.

Late-Wisconsin glaciation of southwestern Newfoundland (with special reference to the Stephenville map-area). Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, Paper , 31 p. Google ScholarCited by: The Antevs Library Online Author Title Catalog The catalog includes nearly titles. The following list, arranged alphabetically by first author for dissertations & theses, books and reprints; then by journal, map and media; can be searched using your browser's "FIND" (ctrl-F) utility. The Canadian Shield, also called the Laurentian Plateau, or Bouclier canadien (French), is a large area of exposed Precambrian igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks (geological shield) that forms the ancient geological core of the North American continent (the North American Craton or Laurentia).Composed of igneous rock resulting from its long volcanic history, the area is covered by a Country: Canada, United States. covered northern New Jersey, and the most recent glaciation was during the late Wisconsinan substage, ab years ago. The action of each ice sheet modified the landscape by deeply scouring valleys, wearing down and streamlining bedrock ridges, hills, and slopes, and by erodingFile Size: KB.